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Interesting Aegean site

Posted: Wed Oct 21, 2009 6:41 pm
by E.P. Grondine
http://www.tovima.gr/default.asp?pid=2& ... 30/08/2009

I am more than a little suspicious of the dating of this Greek site used here - note the Egyptian scarab and the headwear shown. Also the crenellation work, and what looks like an image of Astarte.

Perhaps the grave goods were reused or heirlooms.

Too bad this did not make it to the English press, with photos.

off the cuff analysis, anyone?

Re: Interesting Aegean site

Posted: Wed Oct 21, 2009 6:58 pm
by E.P. Grondine
Another thougth: What has been the sea level rise over the last 4,000 years?

Re: Interesting Aegean site

Posted: Wed Oct 21, 2009 7:06 pm
by Minimalist
off the cuff analysis, anyone?

Its Greek to me.

Re: Interesting Aegean site

Posted: Wed Oct 21, 2009 10:23 pm
by Rokcet Scientist
E.P. Grondine wrote:Another thougth: What has been the sea level rise over the last 4,000 years?
You may want to activate the ocean layer in Google Earth, and inspect it. It's interesting to note that what today is the submerged continental plain (the light blue parts) used to be dry land because of sea level variations and tectonic 'push-ups' (mountain ranges and highlands) and 'sinkers' (valleys, lowlands, and troughs).

I have for years been looking for a graphical ocean mapping application that can display various sea levels at various points in the past, say 20 million years. Mashed with pertinent geologic/tectonic data. To reveal where coastlines ran. Because that is where homo lived.
He still does. 80% of the world's population lives within 100 miles of the sea. I.e. of the coast. That's of course why we need to know where the coastlines ran, back then. Because that's where homo lived.

Global population distribution:
Image

Re: Interesting Aegean site

Posted: Thu Oct 22, 2009 10:33 am
by Minimalist
I think it was Monk who had a such a graphic representation of sea level changes. It was a while ago and I can't recall for certain.

Re: Interesting Aegean site

Posted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 4:11 pm
by Forum Monk
Minimalist wrote:I think it was Monk who had a such a graphic representation of sea level changes. It was a while ago and I can't recall for certain.
I still have the program which allows me to view the planet with any sea level I choose. It is limited in utility because I chose to reduce the view to only 10 x 10 degrees at a time in order to enhance performance. It has to crunch a lot of data from the USGS.