Hominin in Spain 1.2 million years BP

The science or study of primitive societies and the nature of man.

Moderators: Minimalist, MichelleH

Rokcet Scientist

Hominin in Spain 1.2 million years BP

Post by Rokcet Scientist » Wed Mar 26, 2008 2:06 pm


Fossil find is oldest European yet

Spanish jawbone is earliest human remains from Western Europe.

Michael Hopkin

The petite jaw suggests the oldest-found European was probably female.

Spanish palaeontologists have dug up the remains of a 1.2-million-year-old humanlike inhabitant of Western Europe. The fossil find shows that members of our genus, Homo, colonized this region far earlier than many experts had thought.

The primitive hominin — represented by just a fragment of jawbone bearing a handful of wobbly-looking teeth — lived in what is now [...]
Whole article: http://www.nature.com/news/2008/080326/ ... 8.691.html

So was she a cousin of Dmanisi Man?
Last edited by Rokcet Scientist on Wed Mar 26, 2008 8:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.

dannan14
Posts: 481
Joined: Thu Mar 06, 2008 2:47 pm

Post by dannan14 » Wed Mar 26, 2008 2:19 pm

The article about this find on MSN had this to add:
And, critically, the team says the new one also bears similarities to much-older fossils dug up since 1983 in the Caucasus at a place called Dmanisi, in the former Soviet republic of Georgia. These were dated as being up to 1.8 million years old.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23813443&GT1=43001


Sounds like H. erectus really got around.

User avatar
Digit
Posts: 6618
Joined: Tue Oct 31, 2006 1:22 pm
Location: Wales, UK

Post by Digit » Wed Mar 26, 2008 2:21 pm

Lends further support to the regional speciation debate I think.

Beagle
Posts: 4746
Joined: Fri Apr 14, 2006 2:39 am
Location: Tennessee

Post by Beagle » Wed Mar 26, 2008 3:57 pm

Wow, this extends the presence of early humans in Europe by 400,000 yrs. That's an astronomical leap! It should give a lot of scientists much to ponder on.

Hawks already reports but doesn't have much to say at this time.
http://johnhawks.net/weblog/fossils/low ... -2008.html

It's a big boost for regionalism.

User avatar
Cognito
Posts: 1615
Joined: Fri Jul 28, 2006 10:37 am
Location: Southern California

Atapuerca

Post by Cognito » Wed Mar 26, 2008 4:21 pm

This is a cool article and will assist in opening up some minds. That "400,000 years earlier" comment reminded me of the following article which indicates that H. erectus was in China as long as 2.25 million years ago.

http://www.archaeology.org/0001/newsbriefs/china.html

Hardaker thinks they were smart enough to go boating 800,000 years ago. Carved javelins show up 400,000 years ago -- and we still consider these blokes to be cave men. :roll:

I just love the sound of crashing paradigms! :D
Natural selection favors the paranoid

Minimalist
Forum Moderator
Posts: 15830
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2005 1:09 pm
Location: Arizona

Post by Minimalist » Wed Mar 26, 2008 5:41 pm

Hard to imagine crossing the strait of Gibraltar without something resembling a boat, isn't it?
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin

User avatar
john
Posts: 1004
Joined: Wed Jul 19, 2006 7:43 pm

Post by john » Wed Mar 26, 2008 6:36 pm

Minimalist wrote:Hard to imagine crossing the strait of Gibraltar without something resembling a boat, isn't it?
Gosh, Min -

Its obvious that the big difference between the earlier and later versions

Of Homo antecessor

Is that the earlier version had gills.

That gets rid of the

"Too stupid to build boats" argument.

I'm just trying to figure out

The construction of the watertight bags

They put the hematite in.


hoka hey

john
"Man is a marvellous curiosity. When he is at his very, very best he is sort of a low-grade nickel-plated angel; at his worst he is unspeakable, unimaginable; and first and last and all the time he is a sarcasm."

Mark Twain

Rokcet Scientist

Post by Rokcet Scientist » Wed Mar 26, 2008 6:38 pm

Minimalist wrote:Hard to imagine crossing the strait of Gibraltar without something resembling a boat, isn't it?
Naaah, a boat would have been ballast on their trek.

kbs2244
Posts: 2472
Joined: Wed Jul 12, 2006 12:47 pm

Post by kbs2244 » Wed Mar 26, 2008 6:46 pm

I am sorry, but I find it hard to construct a whole habitation from one jaw bone.
The nearest similar one in in Georgia? That is quite a ways away!

Forum Monk
Posts: 1999
Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2006 5:37 pm
Location: USA

Post by Forum Monk » Wed Mar 26, 2008 7:11 pm

Minimalist wrote:Hard to imagine crossing the strait of Gibraltar without something resembling a boat, isn't it?
In modern times, very few have or will venture across the Gilbraltar strait in an unpowered craft. It is a treacherous crossing. If ancient man was intelligent he wouldn't have done it. Typically, modern adventurers are stupid enough to try it. The intelligent guy finds another way across the 14 mile gap. :wink:

Rokcet Scientist

Post by Rokcet Scientist » Wed Mar 26, 2008 7:24 pm

If there was a gap.

Forum Monk
Posts: 1999
Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2006 5:37 pm
Location: USA

Post by Forum Monk » Wed Mar 26, 2008 7:40 pm

Rokcet Scientist wrote:If there was a gap.
Indeed!
Gilbraltar during the LGM (looking south)

Image

Forum Monk
Posts: 1999
Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2006 5:37 pm
Location: USA

Post by Forum Monk » Wed Mar 26, 2008 7:45 pm

btw - it probably looked a lot different 1 million years ago. I don't compensate for continental drift.

Beagle
Posts: 4746
Joined: Fri Apr 14, 2006 2:39 am
Location: Tennessee

Post by Beagle » Wed Mar 26, 2008 8:05 pm

Several years ago it was widely hypothesized that an early group of humans crossed the Strait of Gibralter. That's because the fossil trail suggested that.

Still, these earliest humans in Europe are found in Spain, but now we have the beginning of a fossil trail out of Africa through the Levant beginning at a little over two million years ago.

Although the fossil trail is sparse, this suggests that they probably walked around to Spain the long way. :wink:

Rokcet Scientist

Post by Rokcet Scientist » Wed Mar 26, 2008 8:21 pm

Why do you assume it is either this route or that one? I bet it was all of them!

BTW, it'll be interesting to see when – not if – and how this Spanish find will be included in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homo_Erectus.

And musing on, let's have a look at the land masses 'available to' HE in his day. Sea levels at 400 feet lower levels 'augmented' by some tectonic activity here and there would have made HE's world look a lot different than ours today. With different opportunities for migration.
Basically all of the continental shelves would have been 'available' to HE for habitat and migration. And HE was a hunter-gatherer. A roamer, a trekker. He got around. Eastern China and Australasia for example. Looks like HE was a clever opportunist whose fear of the unknown was surmounted by his curiosity for what was behind the horizon.
But a good harvest of mussels and clams, berries and roots, a couple eggs, and maybe a meaty hare or gazelle always was a more immediate concern of course.

Image
Last edited by Rokcet Scientist on Thu Mar 27, 2008 5:46 am, edited 3 times in total.

Post Reply