Marine Archaeology

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Bruce
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Post by Bruce » Mon Aug 20, 2007 8:24 pm

http://www.sun-herald.com/Newsstory.cfm ... wsArchive2
However, the most interesting fact is that it was found right in the backyard of "our homes," Koski said.

Little Salt Spring is not just another spring in North Port. Not a lot of people even know about it or the unique history it contains. Koski said this spring is one of the greatest archaeological finds in the country.
Hey Min;
Found anything in your backyard yet?

Minimalist
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Post by Minimalist » Mon Aug 20, 2007 11:27 pm

No...but my oleanders are growing very nicely.
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin

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Post by Rokcet Scientist » Tue Aug 21, 2007 5:17 am

Minimalist wrote:No...but my oleanders are growing very nicely.
OK! Now dig under those bushes! Who knows? Maybe there's a cache of 50,000 yr old hand-axes buried there....

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Digit
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Post by Digit » Tue Aug 21, 2007 6:17 am

If he digs under them RS his Missus will bury him in the hole! :lol:
First people deny a thing, then they belittle it, then they say it was known all along! Von Humboldt

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Post by Minimalist » Tue Aug 21, 2007 9:28 am

You'd better believe it.
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin

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Sam Salmon
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Post by Sam Salmon » Tue Aug 21, 2007 11:28 am

More on a developing Marine Archaeology story here in BC.


Sea floor off Charlottes may explain how people came to the Americas

In a Canadian archeological project that could revolutionize understanding of when and how humans first reached the New World, federal researchers in B.C. have begun probing an underwater site off the Queen Charlotte Islands for traces of a possible prehistoric camp on the shores of an ancient lake long since submerged by the Pacific Ocean.

The landmark investigation, led by Parks Canada scientist Daryl Fedje, is seeking evidence to support a contentious new theory about the peopling of the Americas that is gradually gaining support in scholarly circles. It holds that ancient Asian seafarers, drawn on by food-rich kelp beds ringing the Pacific coasts of present-day Russia, Alaska and British Columbia, began populating this hemisphere thousands of years before the migration of Siberian big-game hunters -- who are known to have travelled across the dried up Bering Strait and down an ice-free corridor east of the Rockies as the last glaciers began retreating about 13,000 years ago.

The earlier maritime migrants are thought to have plied the coastal waters of the North Pacific in sealskin boats, moving in small groups.

Over many generations, they migrated from their traditional homelands in the Japanese islands or elsewhere along Asia's eastern seaboard.

Interest in the theory -- which is profiled in the latest edition of New Scientist magazine by Canadian science writer Heather Pringle -- has been stoked by recent DNA studies in the U.S. showing tell-tale links between a 10,000-year-old skeleton found in an Alaskan cave and genetic traits identified in modern Japanese and Tibetan populations, as well as in aboriginal groups along the west coasts of North and South America.

The rise of the "coastal migration" theory has also been spurred by a sprinkling of other ancient archeological finds throughout the Americas -- several of them, including the 14,850-year-old Chilean site of Monte Verde, too old to fit the traditional theory of an overland migration by the "first Americans" that didn't begin for another millennium or two.

Proponents of coastal migration argue that Ice Age migrants in boats may have island-hopped southward along North America's west coast as early as 16,000 years ago, taking advantage of small refuges of land that had escaped envelopment by glaciers.

The difficulty is that nearly all of the land that might contain traces of human settlement or activity -- the critical proof for archeologists -- is now under water.

Several significant finds have been made in raised caves along the B.C. coast that were not inundated by the rising Pacific in post-glacial Canada.

In 2003, Simon Fraser University scientists reported the discovery of 16,000-year-old mountain goat bones in a cave near Port Eliza on Vancouver Island, and similar finds of prehistoric bear bones pre-dating the glacial retreat have been held up as proof of a shoreline ecosystem that could have sustained large mammals, as well as human hunters.

The new Parks Canada target is at a site in the Gwaii Hanaas National Park Reserve just north of Burnaby Island, near the southern end of the Queen Charlottes.

According to the New Scientist, Fedje has discovered evidence of a prehistoric lake and streambed about 50 metres below the surface at a site called Section Cove, as well as signs that the river and lake were once rich sources of salmon -- an "irresistible" food source for ancient coastal migrants.

"We are pretty positive that there will be an archeological site where we think it should be on that lake shore," Fedje told the British-based publication. "There's no reason why people couldn't have been on these old landscapes 14,000 or more years ago."

http://www.canada.com/vancouversun/news ... 50960205fe

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Post by Minimalist » Tue Aug 21, 2007 11:56 am

Great find, Sam.

It's Stafford's "Solutrean Crossing" transplanted to the Pacific.
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin

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Digit
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Post by Digit » Tue Aug 21, 2007 12:01 pm

And again by those non-existant early seafarers. They didn't half not get about didn't they Min? 8)
First people deny a thing, then they belittle it, then they say it was known all along! Von Humboldt

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daybrown
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Post by daybrown » Tue Aug 21, 2007 12:10 pm

RG Wasson, Persephone's quest, show us A. Muscaria icons carved in a Siberian cliff face about 500 mi from the Bearing strait. 2000 or more years old. The same icon was used in SE Europe several thousand miles to the SW. Amanita Muscaria dont grow in arctic tundra either.

Recently, a skeleton found in Britain was, thru chemical traces in the bones, tracked back to growing up along the Mediterranean.

Then too, we have "Pappilllion", in which the escaped prisoner from Devil's Island makes it to the South American jungle. where he would've been dinner, but the chief saw his butterfly tattoo, and wanted one also, so gave Pappillion a couple of young hotties to take care of him. Adding his genes to the pool.

This kind of thing has gone on for so long, that all these elegant theories about where Native Americans came from is like arguing about how many quarks can dance on the head of a pin.
Any god watching me hasta be bored, and needs to get a life.

Minimalist
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Post by Minimalist » Tue Aug 21, 2007 12:39 pm

Yeah, DB but the Clovis-First Club is on the run so best to keep nipping at their heels!
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin

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Digit
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Post by Digit » Tue Aug 21, 2007 12:48 pm

Do me a favour Min, at my age I can't keep up with them! :lol:
First people deny a thing, then they belittle it, then they say it was known all along! Von Humboldt

Minimalist
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Post by Minimalist » Tue Aug 21, 2007 1:15 pm

Use a golf cart!
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin

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Digit
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Post by Digit » Tue Aug 21, 2007 1:31 pm

Use a golf cart!
:lol: :lol:
First people deny a thing, then they belittle it, then they say it was known all along! Von Humboldt

Beagle
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Post by Beagle » Wed Aug 29, 2007 2:57 pm

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070824/ap_ ... k08wdvieAA
It's the Black Sea, not far from Ukraine, a region long closed to outsiders and now yielding a treasure trove of Byzantine vessels that met their ends 1,000 or more years ago.

For Ballard the archaeologist, those vessels and their contents are a delight.
Black Sea marine archaeology.

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Digit
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Post by Digit » Wed Aug 29, 2007 3:33 pm

Great news Beag! I look forward to some exciting developments.
First people deny a thing, then they belittle it, then they say it was known all along! Von Humboldt

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