Boats Taken For Granted!

The Western Hemisphere. General term for the Americas following their discovery by Europeans, thus setting them in contradistinction to the Old World of Africa, Europe, and Asia.

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Minimalist
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Boats Taken For Granted!

Post by Minimalist » Thu May 28, 2009 6:19 pm

http://www2.canada.com/vancouversun/new ... 6806ebda2c
The Pacific Coast of the Americas was settled starting about 15,000 years ago during the last glacial retreat by seafaring peoples following a "kelp highway" rich in marine resources, a noted professor of anthropology theorized Wednesday.
The landlubbers will hate this remark.
"These kelp forests would have provided a migration corridor near shore with no major barriers," he said. "It would have been a very similar ecological zone to follow and a rich one."

It's hard to know what kind of vessels carried these early seafarers, although dugouts (perhaps carved from driftwood) and skin boats are possible, he said.
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin

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Post by kbs2244 » Thu May 28, 2009 7:04 pm

It has always seemed to me that, even today, there is a Northern vs. Southern hemisphere view of the oceans.
In the north, they are viewed as barriers.
In the south they are viewed as highways.

E.P. Grondine

Re: Boats Taken For Granted!

Post by E.P. Grondine » Thu May 28, 2009 7:27 pm

Minimalist wrote:
The Pacific Coast of the Americas was settled starting about 15,000 years ago during the last glacial retreat by seafaring peoples following a "kelp highway" rich in marine resources, a noted professor of anthropology theorized Wednesday.
The dates are likely to be far older than that, once the pre-Holocene impact sites are discovered. Due to rising sea levels since the end of the ice age, coastal sites are now under around 350 of water.

Given that rise, the only place to look is for related sites at higher elevations. If they were using dugouts from the large logs of the Pacific Northwest, then quarries would make good spots to search for. If skin boats, then elevated sites near walrus (?) rookeries would be good candidates, particularly if they had some other attraction in food stuff or resource.

E.P. Grondine
Man and Impact in the Americas

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Post by Rokcet Scientist » Fri May 29, 2009 8:55 am

What "quarries", and to search 'm for what, E.P.?

If we agree that the overwhelming majority of possible find sites of pre-holocene hominin life are now under 400 feet of water, it follows that today's coastlines were then faaar inland relative to where those hominins lived and trekked: along the coast of that era.
I.o.w. the odds of finding any pre-holocene hominin remains on today's dry land are negligible, imo. And thus a wasted effort.

Where is Bob Ballard when you need him? Haven't heard of him for some time now.

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Sam Salmon
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Post by Sam Salmon » Fri May 29, 2009 10:18 am

As posted in the past I live a 5 minute bike ride from what was almost certainly a rest stop on the Kelp highways-English Bay.

The climate here is such that very very little survives the incessant dampness, one village in WA state was buried under a mud slide and so some record remains.

But further north along the fjords and channels there's nothing but bare rock and an occasional unidentifiable pictograph, anything else is long buried under the sea.

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Post by dannan14 » Sat May 30, 2009 10:53 am

But those sites are not uniformly underwater. In the areas where glaciers were present they depressed teh Earth's crust. As they melted, the crust rebounded, hit a peak, and then sank just a little. On many islands off British Columbia and Alaska shoreline sites have been discovered well above today's sea level.

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Post by Minimalist » Sat May 30, 2009 11:48 am

Even if they were, archaeological finds have been made in wet climates before. Outside of a desert environment, almost any find of an organic material is a miraculous event. But it does happen in peat bogs in Northern Europe for example and it is hard to imagine anything with a "wetter" environment. The key, or one of the keys, seems to be rapid burial so the air does not have a chance to work on the organic material.

Maybe they'll get lucky and stumble across an ancient campsite that was buried by a mudslide from one of those hills?

However....the emphasis is on the "lucky."
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin

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Post by dannan14 » Sat May 30, 2009 8:08 pm

The peat bogs are a very low oxygen environment. i think that is why they are so good at preserving organic material

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Post by Minimalist » Sun May 31, 2009 10:20 am

Venice was built by pounding wooden pilings into the mud. They are still there too.
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin

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Digit
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Post by Digit » Sun May 31, 2009 11:41 am

First people deny a thing, then they belittle it, then they say it was known all along! Von Humboldt

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Post by Leona Conner » Sun May 31, 2009 6:18 pm

Interesting article. I remember seeing something about Flag Fen on Time Team several years ago.

Rokcet Scientist

Post by Rokcet Scientist » Sun May 31, 2009 7:35 pm

Minimalist wrote:Venice was built by pounding wooden pilings into the mud. They are still there too.
As was/is Amsterdam.

Rokcet Scientist

Post by Rokcet Scientist » Sun May 31, 2009 7:38 pm

Minimalist wrote:Maybe they'll get lucky and stumble across an ancient campsite that was buried by a mudslide from one of those hills?

However....the emphasis is on the "lucky."
"We" have been lucky before: Pompeii and Herculaneum.
I am in fact 'waiting' for HE/HSS finds in Toba ash (abo's ancestors on their long trek to Oz).

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Post by Minimalist » Sun May 31, 2009 7:58 pm

I remember a great quote on "luck," R/S.
I'm a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.

--Thomas Jefferson
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin

Rokcet Scientist

Post by Rokcet Scientist » Tue Jun 02, 2009 6:25 am

Minimalist wrote:I remember a great quote on "luck," R/S.
I'm a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.

--Thomas Jefferson
OK, start digging into Sumatra's 14 meters of ash then... ;-P

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