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A Study of Early North American Skulls

Posted: Mon Feb 03, 2020 8:16 am
by shawomet
An analysis of North American human skulls dated variously from 9000-13000 years ago, and the suggested implications for the peopling of the Americas.

https://www.livescience.com/skulls-from ... verse.html

The paper:

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/artic ... ne.0227444

Re: A Study of Early North American Skulls

Posted: Tue Feb 04, 2020 10:26 am
by circumspice
Thanks for the links shawomet!

Re: A Study of Early North American Skulls

Posted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 12:32 pm
by Simon21
Odd that the Koories have been in Aust for about 40,000 years and mankind in the Americas for 20,000. What accounts for the difference?

Re: A Study of Early North American Skulls

Posted: Sat Feb 15, 2020 3:39 am
by circumspice
Simon21 wrote:
Fri Feb 14, 2020 12:32 pm
Odd that the Koories have been in Aust for about 40,000 years and mankind in the Americas for 20,000. What accounts for the difference?
I'd say that accessibility was probably the issue. Was Australia covered in glaciers from coast to coast in the period of time when it was first colonized by humans? I think not. A group of people can't colonize a land that is inaccessible.

Re: A Study of Early North American Skulls

Posted: Mon Feb 17, 2020 8:22 am
by Simon21
Were there not parts of Alaska that were habitable - Beringeria?

Seems the archaeology is a bit erratic, no Lake Mungo

Re: A Study of Early North American Skulls

Posted: Wed Feb 19, 2020 10:16 am
by shawomet
Simon21 wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 8:22 am
Were there not parts of Alaska that were habitable - Beringeria?

Seems the archaeology is a bit erratic, no Lake Mungo
Sure. Enter the Beringian Standstill:

https://www.hakaimagazine.com/features/ ... continent/

For the record, it's spelled Beringia.....

Re: A Study of Early North American Skulls

Posted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 7:55 am
by Simon21
This evokes the question about white settlement in the North America during the colonial period - why on earth did anyone bother sailing or walking from one freezing place to another.

Re: A Study of Early North American Skulls

Posted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 3:26 pm
by Cognito
This evokes the question about white settlement in the North America during the colonial period - why on earth did anyone bother sailing or walking from one freezing place to another.
Answer: Freedom of religion (i.e. politics) and the ability to own land.

Warmer latitudes farther south were controlled by the Spanish, and White Anglo Saxon Protestants were not welcomed.

Re: A Study of Early North American Skulls

Posted: Wed Feb 26, 2020 6:14 am
by Simon21
This evokes the question about white settlement in the North America during the colonial period - why on earth did anyone bother sailing or walking from one freezing place to another.
Answer: Freedom of religion (i.e. politics) and the ability to own of land.

Warmer latitudes farther south were controlled by the Spanish, and White Anglo Saxon Protestants were not welcomed.
Is that entirely true? Were the Carolinas for eg completely under Spanish control by 1620?

And Massachusetts or Bermuda, they were all subjects of the King (or Lord Protector), recusants but still subjects as they acknowledged.

Re: A Study of Early North American Skulls

Posted: Wed Feb 26, 2020 11:33 am
by Cognito
Is that entirely true? Were the Carolinas for eg completely under Spanish control by 1620?
The English were well aware of Spain's reaction to the French establishing Ft. Caroline in 1564 and its resulting destruction and execution of all male inhabitants by Menendez. St Augustine was settled by the Spanish in 1565 and was well-garrisoned.

English colonists stayed far north at the time; Jamestown in 1607 and Plymouth in 1620. Reading through the accounts of settlement, you will find those fears expressed by the founders.

Re: A Study of Early North American Skulls

Posted: Wed Feb 26, 2020 12:25 pm
by Minimalist
There were sporadic Spanish attempts to move north from Florida. They seem to have been more interested in gold than agriculture, though. The Carolinas are not big in gold.

Re: A Study of Early North American Skulls

Posted: Fri Feb 28, 2020 9:20 am
by Cognito
There were sporadic Spanish attempts to move north from Florida. They seem to have been more interested in gold than agriculture, though. The Carolinas are not big in gold.
The English settlers in Jamestown were planning to strike it rich in gold deposits also: https://invest.usgoldbureau.com/news/ja ... king-gold/ Obviously, geology was not a developed discipline at the time since the tidal areas of the Carolinas or Virginia were not the right place to be searching for gold.

However, gold was eventually discovered inland, two centuries later: https://goldrushgallery.com/dahlmint/c_ ... tline.html

Re: A Study of Early North American Skulls

Posted: Fri Feb 28, 2020 3:18 pm
by Minimalist
The conquistadors were not known for their patience, amigo. :lol:

Re: A Study of Early North American Skulls

Posted: Wed Mar 04, 2020 3:20 pm
by Simon21
There were sporadic Spanish attempts to move north from Florida. They seem to have been more interested in gold than agriculture, though. The Carolinas are not big in gold.
But neither is the Carribean

Re: A Study of Early North American Skulls

Posted: Wed Mar 04, 2020 3:27 pm
by Simon21
The English were well aware of Spain's reaction to the French establishing Ft. Caroline in 1564 and its resulting destruction and execution of all male inhabitants by Menendez. St Augustine was settled by the Spanish in 1565 and was well-garrisoned.

English colonists stayed far north at the time; Jamestown in 1607 and Plymouth in 1620. Reading through the accounts of settlement, you will find those fears expressed by the founders.
Doubtless but they were also terrified of the native peoples.

It remains a fact that there were more hospitable places that the freezing coastal areas of New England